THE ATLANTIC

News feeds from The Atlantic magazine.

The Atlantic

  • Studying Greenland’s Ice to Understand Climate Change
    Lucas Jackson / Reuters Earlier this year, Lucas Jackson, a photographer with Reuters, joined a team of scientists affiliated with a NASA project named Oceans Melting Greenland (OMG) and traveled with it to the Greenland ice sheet and fjords. Jackson photographed the researchers as they set up their scientific equipment and took readings to help understand the ongoing impact of the melting glaciers and map out what to expect in the future. Jackson says: “For both journalists and scientists, climate change is difficult to document. It most often happens imperceptibly—a tenth of a degree increase in temperature, a few less ..... READ MORE
    Source: The AtlanticPublished on 2018-09-19
  • A Five-Letter Adjective Is Shaking Up Politics in Eastern Europe
    There is plenty to consider when a country decides to change its name. What impact, for example, will it have on its government institutions, its passports, or its currency? Will the change affect its national airline or its sports teams? How does a country go about registering its new name with international institutions?When Macedonians head to the polls later this month to cast their vote in a national referendum on whether to change their country’s name from the Republic of Macedonia (or the Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, as its known by international bodies) to the “Republic of North Macedonia,” ..... READ MORE
    Source: The AtlanticPublished on 2018-09-19
  • A Surprising Finding About Refugees in Europe Amid a Political Reckoning
    Three years after an estimated 1.3 million people sought asylum in Europe, immigration remains a polarizing issue that has reshaped the political landscape across the continent. It’s almost certain to dominate the agenda at a meeting of European Union leaders that begins Wednesday in Salzburg, Vienna: Immigration policy is a priority for Sebastian Kurz, the conservative chancellor of Austria whose country holds the rotating EU presidency, as well as for his coalition allies from the far-right Freedom Party.But the political consequences of the surge of immigrants in 2015—the rise of far-right, anti-immigrant parties—may belie a more sympathetic view of refugees, ..... READ MORE
    Source: The AtlanticPublished on 2018-09-19
  • South Korea May Have Just Helped Break a Nuclear Impasse
    Over the past year, the South Korean government has pursued what could be called the Field of Dreams approach to resolving the North Korean nuclear crisis: If you build peace, they will come. President Moon Jae In, a longtime practitioner of the liberal “Sunshine Policy” of engagement with North Korea, has repeatedly sought to establish facts on the ground that favor diplomacy when the ground has convulsed beneath his feet.When U.S. and North Korean leaders were threatening one another with nuclear war, Moon seated them an arm’s length away from one another while hosting the “peace” Olympics in Pyeongchang. When ..... READ MORE
    Source: The AtlanticPublished on 2018-09-19
  • American Weirdness: Observations From an Expat
    Sometimes it begins with the toothpaste. Whenever I go back to the United States from Europe, where I’ve lived for more than half my adult life, I’ll often find myself in a jet-lagged fog at a huge American drugstore staring at the toothpaste aisle. Why? I ask myself, or anyone who’s around. Why are there so many kinds of toothpaste? Whitening, baking soda, clean mint, fresh mint, gel, paste, swirls of gel and paste, kids’ toothpastes, sensitive-teeth toothpaste. Why?It’s not that there isn’t a variety of toothpaste in Paris, where I live. France is a developed country with a market ..... READ MORE
    Source: The AtlanticPublished on 2018-09-18
  • Russia’s Tangled Syria Policy May Prove Unsustainable
    A Russian military plane was shot down over the Mediterranean on Monday—an incident that, despite being the direct result of antiaircraft fire from its Syrian ally, Moscow blamed on Israel, another of its de facto allies. The incident shows not only the clashing tangle of competing interests in Syria as the civil war nears its end, but also how easily that dynamic can rupture carefully cultivated relationships.At issue is the Russian Ilyushin-20 aircraft shot down over the Mediterranean on Monday by a Syrian S-200 surface-to-air missile, an incident that killed 15 Russian military personnel. Russia’s Defense Ministry said the aircraft ..... READ MORE
    Source: The AtlanticPublished on 2018-09-18
  • What Would You Nominate as the Eighth Wonder of the World?
    Vanessa Hua, author, A River of StarsAngkor Wat is where my husband proposed to me at dawn, the sky rosy and golden over the spires reflected in the moat. With its stunning bas-reliefs and crumbling temples in eternal battle with banyan trees, the temple complex inspires awe and contemplation of the sweep of history and the atrocities of war.Lydia Kallipoliti, author, The Architecture of Closed WorldsFamous for getting the first humans to the moon, the Apollo 11 command module is astoundingly small and unrefined yet evinces our innate desire to reach uninhabitable territories.Gary Busey, actor and author, BuseyismsMount Rushmore is ..... READ MORE
    Source: The AtlanticPublished on 2018-09-18
  • Another Blow Against Refugees
    The Trump administration has reduced the maximum number of refugees it will accept in the next fiscal year from 45,000 to 30,000, the lowest level since the current refugee-resettlement program went into effect more than three decades ago.  “The improved refugee policy of this administration serves the national interest of the United States, and helps those in need all around the world,” U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said in a brief statement Monday. He did not take questions.Humanitarian groups that work with refugees in the U.S. criticized the decision. “It’s awful,” Mark Hetfield, president and CEO of HIAS, the global ..... READ MORE
    Source: The AtlanticPublished on 2018-09-17
  • A Temporary Reprieve for Syria’s Last Rebel-Held Province
    A disaster seemed imminent in Syria’s Idlib province. Bashar al-Assad, the president of Syria, had massed his forces on the borders of the province, the last major rebel stronghold in the country, while Syrian-government and Russian warplanes bombarded towns and villages along the front lines. It appeared to be a grim replay of the sequence of events that has brought other rebel-held areas under Assad’s sway—only this time, it was playing out in an area that is home to nearly 3 million people with nowhere to flee. “The nightmare scenario … is that the regime and the Russians drive well ..... READ MORE
    Source: The AtlanticPublished on 2018-09-17
  • Photos: The Aftermath of Super Typhoon Mangkhut
    Zhang Zhou / VCG via Getty Typhoon Mangkhut, also known as Ompong in the Philippines, began forming in the Pacific Ocean 10 days ago and quickly intensified to a Category 5–equivalent super typhoon with sustained winds of 125 miles an hour by September 11. Its path took it westward, across the Philippines, then into Hong Kong and southeastern China, where it has now been downgraded to a tropical storm after tearing up villages and cities, flooding coastlines and plains, and causing massive landslides. At least 50 people are known to have been killed by Mangkhut so far, most in the ..... READ MORE
    Source: The AtlanticPublished on 2018-09-17
  • The Tiny Blond Bible Teacher Taking on the Evangelical Political Machine
    When Beth Moore arrived in Houston in the 1980s, she found few models for young women who wanted to teach scripture. Many conservative Christian denominations believed that women should not hold authority over men, whether in church or at home; many denominations still believe this. In some congregations, women could not speak from the lectern on a Sunday or even read the Bible in front of men. But Moore was resolute: God, she felt, had called her to serve. So she went where many women in Texas were going in the ’80s: aerobics class. Moore kicked her way into ministry, ..... READ MORE
    Source: The AtlanticPublished on 2018-09-17
  • Putin Won’t Stop the Slaughter of Idlib
    Bashar al-Assad has never been coy about his plans. Through much of Syria’s civil war, its president has proclaimed that opposition is equivalent to terrorism, and must be wiped out. His regime is simply following the policy that grew out of its supporters’ favorite slogan: “Assad, or we burn the country.” This is why no amount of pablum from the Russia-sponsored process to craft a political resolution to the conflict—and humiliate Western powers by superseding their own peace process—can stop the terrible endgame that awaits in Idlib.In recent days, the Russian air force has intensified its bombing of the rebel-held ..... READ MORE
    Source: The AtlanticPublished on 2018-09-17
  • America Needs an Entirely New Foreign Policy for the Trump Age
    Amid all the talk about the Democratic Party’s move to the left, a contrary phenomenon has gone comparatively unnoticed: On foreign policy, Washington Democrats keep attacking Donald Trump from the right. They’re not criticizing him merely for his lackluster response to Russia’s interference in the 2016 elections. They’re criticizing him for seeking a rapprochement with key American adversaries and for potentially reducing America’s military footprint overseas.In June, Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer reprimanded Trump for meeting with Kim Jong Un and warned him not to weaken sanctions absent the complete “dismantlement and removal of North Korea’s nuclear weapons and ballistic ..... READ MORE
    Source: The AtlanticPublished on 2018-09-16
  • A Physical Public Square in the Digital Age
    LONDON—London’s Hyde Park may be one of the city’s largest parks, but it’s also one of its most typical. Across its expansive 350 acres can be found park goers doing the usual park things: weekend picnics, pickup frisbee games, or bike rides along its winding paths. There’s an art gallery, a café, and a lake for swimming and paddle boating. And on its northeastern corner, every Sunday afternoon, there is something that looks a lot like chaos.But it’s not entirely that. In reality, it’s just a crowd of people, most of them men, gathered around an individual preaching from a ..... READ MORE
    Source: The AtlanticPublished on 2018-09-16
  • Internet Sleuths Are Hunting for China’s Secret Internment Camps for Muslims
    Citizen journalists and scholars are in a race against time, scouring the internet for evidence before the Chinese government can erase it. Since last year, the country has been sending vast numbers of Muslims to internment camps, where it tries to force them to renounce Islam and embrace the Communist Party, as The New York Times and other media outlets have reported based on interviews with former inmates. At this point, as many as one million Muslims are being held in the camps, according to an estimate widely cited by the UN and U.S. officials.China has denied that it aims ..... READ MORE
    Source: The AtlanticPublished on 2018-09-15
  • Experience Infinity at the World’s Largest Mall
    Upon entering China’s Yiwu Market, Jessica Kingdon experienced a sensory overload. She had intended to capture the cinematic experience of the world’s largest wholesale mall, but she couldn’t decide what to film. “I kept getting distracted because the number of stalls feels infinite,” Kingdon told The Atlantic. “It's like the ultimate FOMO experience.” Ultimately, Kingdon decided to focus on what she describes as “the quieter, more subtle moments” amidst the chaotic atmosphere of the five-mile-long consumer metropolis. Comprised of mostly static shots, her short observational documentary, Commodity City, is a mesmerizing window into the daily lives of some of ..... READ MORE
    Source: The AtlanticPublished on 2018-09-14
  • Emmanuel Macron Tries—Slowly—To Reckon With France’s Past
    France’s colonial rule in Algeria, as well as the war that brought it to an end, remains an open wound in French historical memory despite ending more than 50 years ago. For the French, it’s a dark era of its history that, like the country’s collaboration with Nazi Germany under Vichy rule, many seem anxious to forget. Few French leaders have been willing to acknowledge France’s colonization of Algeria or the brutal measures employed to suppress revolts against its rule, let alone apologize for it.But this week, French President Emmanuel Macron came close to doing just that. In a statement ..... READ MORE
    Source: The AtlanticPublished on 2018-09-14
  • Photos of the Week: Robotic Arms, Sheepdog Trials, Giant Carrot
    Anupam Nath / AP Hurricane Florence reaches the Carolinas, Vostok 2018 military exercises in Siberia, multiple house fires in suburban Massachusetts, pedal-car racing in England, ballet in the streets of Mexico City, a dinosaur in North Korea, a pilgrimage to catch fish on Spain’s Gran Canaria, scenes from New York Fashion Week, and much more ..... READ MORE
    Source: The AtlanticPublished on 2018-09-14
  • The Sex-Abuse Scandal Is Growing Faster Than the Church Can Contain It
    This has been a dramatic week for Catholics around the world. As Pope Francis faces mounting pressure to address the spiraling clergy sex-abuse crisis, almost every day has brought some new revelation or declaration.  Since Tuesday alone, a group of American Catholic leaders went to Rome to ask Francis some tough questions, while a women’s open letter demanding answers from him crossed the 45,000-signature mark. The pontiff summoned bishops from around the world to a future meeting, while making one bishop the subject of a new investigation. One cardinal who had come under fire for allegedly enabling accused priests to ..... READ MORE
    Source: The AtlanticPublished on 2018-09-14
  • It’s Not Too Late to Prevent a Russia-China Axis
    Chinese tanks splashed through the mud, while a few dozen helicopters flew in formation overhead in eastern Russia, and a young Chinese military recruit explained, “I have never experienced an overseas deployment of this scale.” The scene neatly summed up the much-written-about, enormous Russian military exercises that took place this week. Participants included 300,000 Russian and 3,200 Chinese soldiers. They deeply rattled the West.Is this the beginning of a Chinese-Russian alliance, as some news outlets proclaimed? Is President Trump pushing President Xi into President Putin’s arms? Not quite. These are slower, more subtle developments: A true Chinese-Russian “axis” is still ..... READ MORE
    Source: The AtlanticPublished on 2018-09-14