THE ATLANTIC

News feeds from The Atlantic magazine.

The Atlantic

  • ‘U.S. Relations With Turkey Are Not Good at this Time’
    President Trump announced Friday he had ordered the doubling of tariffs on Turkish steel and aluminum imports, exacerbating relations with a NATO ally that has proven intransigent in recent years.“I have just authorized a doubling of Tariffs on Steel and Aluminum with respect to Turkey as their currency, the Turkish Lira, slides rapidly downward against our very strong Dollar!” Trump said on Twitter. “Aluminum will now be 20% and Steel 50%. Our relations with Turkey are not good at this time!”One could argue they haven’t been “good” for some time. Ozgur Unluhisarcikli, an expert on trans-Atlantic relations with the German ..... READ MORE
    Source: The AtlanticPublished on 2018-08-11
  • The Unbelievable Story of North Korea’s Most-Celebrated Propagandist
    One day in the summer of 1967, a young South Korean army captain named Oh Hyung Jae received a summons from the army counterintelligence corps. His specialty was not espionage, but applied mathematics, which he taught at the Korea Military Academy. What could they want with me?, he wondered as an army Jeep pulled up to his office.At the counterintelligence bureau in Seoul, an agent was waiting for him. In his hands he held Oh’s old military academy application from 1955. A grim, knowing look stretched across his face. “Didn’t you leave something out?” he asked Oh, handing him the ..... READ MORE
    Source: The AtlanticPublished on 2018-08-11
  • A U.S. Funding Review Is Hurting Aid Groups and Palestinians
    In January, Donald Trump’s administration suspended the financial aid it provides Palestinians, pending what it said was a review. Seven months later, not only are there few indications the review is complete, but the freeze on tens of millions of dollars in mostly humanitarian aid has hobbled the aid agencies that receive the funds, and, more consequentially, crippled the lives of more than 1 million people who live in dire need.  “A lot of donors have put more money on the table: the U.K., Canada, Japan, but it’s not enough,” Jamie McGoldrick, the United Nations development and humanitarian coordinator in Palestine, ..... READ MORE
    Source: The AtlanticPublished on 2018-08-10
  • Photos of the Week: Robot Cat, Purple Water, Tunnel of Love
    FTCS (SS) Bob Nguyen / U.S. Navy Missiles fly between Israel and Gaza, dizzying views in Hong Kong, hot summer days in Europe, a migrant family is reunited in Guatemala, a boisterous rodeo in Australia, wildfires intensify in California, glass floors are installed in Seattle’s Space Needle, and much more. ..... READ MORE
    Source: The AtlanticPublished on 2018-08-10
  • Pro-Abortion-Rights Activists Won in Ireland, But Not Argentina
    When Ireland voted in its historic referendum in May to overturn its decades-old ban on abortion, it looked as if more change could follow. If Ireland voted to liberalize abortion access, maybe Northern Ireland would be next. And after that, who knows? The Irish referendum proved that even a Catholic-majority country was ready to have the debate. Perhaps it wouldn’t be long before others would do the same.  Another vote on abortion did come three months later, this time to Argentina. But this Catholic-majority country decided differently. On Thursday, Argentina’s Senate voted down a bill to decriminalize abortion access in the ..... READ MORE
    Source: The AtlanticPublished on 2018-08-10
  • Trump’s Secret War on Terror
    President Donald Trump has dramatically expanded the War on Terror. But you—and perhaps he—would never know it.Since he came into office, Trump has reportedly abandoned Obama-era rules governing the use of drones in noncombat theaters such as Somalia and Libya. Whereas Obama operationally expanded but bureaucratically constrained drones’ use, from what we can tell, Trump’s new rules instead vest military commanders with strike decisions , without requiring approval from the White House.Superficially, this approach may have some logic to it. Use of drones, like most counterterrorism efforts, is complex and multifaceted, requiring a careful balancing of military necessity with concepts ..... READ MORE
    Source: The AtlanticPublished on 2018-08-10
  • Images From the Lombok Island Earthquake
    Tatan Syuflana / AP On the night of August 5, a 6.9-magnitude earthquake struck the Indonesian island of Lombok and nearby Bali. The northern area of Lombok was badly affected, with thousands of buildings damaged or destroyed. Indonesian authorities are still working to evacuate and shelter those in need, and have issued varying updates, but at least 250 deaths and many hundreds of injuries have been reported so far, and tens of thousands have been left homeless. The area was hit by a 6.4-magnitude foreshock on July 29, and has experienced a number of aftershocks, including a 5.9-magnitude tremor yesterday. ..... READ MORE
    Source: The AtlanticPublished on 2018-08-09
  • How a Warrior-Poindexter Helped Ethiopia and Eritrea Make Peace
    On June 23 in Addis Ababa, a hand grenade exploded within earshot of Abiy Ahmed Ali, Ethiopia’s newly inaugurated, widely adored prime minister. Due to either good luck or ineptitude on behalf of the assailants (likely both), Abiy emerged unscathed. Regardless, this was no way to treat a strong contender for next year’s Nobel Peace Prize: The 42-year-old premier had just ended the two-decade-long conflict between Ethiopia and its recalcitrant neighbor, the mountainous redoubt of Eritrea. Five suspects were charged following the attack, which appears to have been an attempt to derail Abiy’s aggressive slate of reforms—an agenda with its ..... READ MORE
    Source: The AtlanticPublished on 2018-08-09
  • The Saudi-Canada Crisis Will Damage People’s Health
    It’s been less than a week since Canada urged Saudi Arabia to release peaceful human-rights activists held in detention, but already the kingdom has responded with several aggressive moves. It expelled the Canadian ambassador, summoned its own ambassador back home, froze all new trade and investments with Canada, suspended flights to and from Toronto, and recalled about 16,000 Saudi students. The kingdom also decided to transfer Saudi patients in Canadian hospitals to other countries, and ordered Saudi medical residents currently in Canada to leave the country.These moves are likely to have a direct and deeply damaging impact on Saudi and ..... READ MORE
    Source: The AtlanticPublished on 2018-08-09
  • Saudi Arabia Rejects Human-Rights Criticism, Then Crucifies Someone
    Even as it excoriated Canada for scolding it over human rights, Saudi Arabia beheaded a man Wednesday in Mecca, then put his body on public display, for allegedly stabbing a woman to death. The method of punishment is known in Saudi Arabia as a crucifixion, which the government says is sanctioned by Islamic law, and is reserved for only the most severe crimes in the kingdom.The suspect in this case was a man from Myanmar who was accused of breaking into the home of a Burmese woman and repeatedly stabbing her until she died, according to Bloomberg. He was also ..... READ MORE
    Source: The AtlanticPublished on 2018-08-09
  • The U.S. Sanctions Russia for Skripal Poisoning—Five Months Later
    Five months after a deadly nerve agent threatened the life of a former Russian spy and his daughter in Britain, Donald Trump’s administration announced Wednesday that it will be imposing new sanctions on Russia for its alleged involvement in the attack.The announcement was made after the United States formally concluded this week that Russia’s alleged use of the Novichok nerve agent in the attempted assassination of the former Russian spy Sergei Skripal and his daughter, Yulia, put Moscow in violation of international law. The sanctions, which State Department Spokeswoman Heather Nauert said are expected to go into effect later this ..... READ MORE
    Source: The AtlanticPublished on 2018-08-09
  • What It Would Take for Iran to Talk to Trump
    On August 6, Donald Trump’s administration reimposed economic sanctions on Iran that Barack Obama’s administration had lifted when it signed the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA) in 2015, the anticipated next step following Trump’s decision to leave the deal in May. Since then, the Trump administration has talked about bringing more economic pressure on Tehran not only to end its nuclear ambitions, but also to curb its regional influence and even weaken the Islamic Republic’s hold on power, which led many to see U.S. policy as one aimed at regime change.Now it appears that President Trump’s goal is far ..... READ MORE
    Source: The AtlanticPublished on 2018-08-08
  • Historic Cat Photos on International Cat Day
    Bettmann / Getty Earlier this century, the International Fund for Animal Welfare declared August 8 to be International Cat Day, a day set aside to celebrate our feline friends, which apparently just can’t get enough attention. To honor this day, I’ve gathered a small collection of archival images of cats and kittens below. Fashions and technologies may change over time, but cats never go out of style. ..... READ MORE
    Source: The AtlanticPublished on 2018-08-08
  • Photos of Abandoned Russia
    Vadim Razumov / Wikipedia Across the vastness of Russia—the world’s largest country, at some 6.6 million square miles—and over the span of its long history, countless houses, factories, churches, villages, military bases, and other structures have been built and then left behind: imperial-era palaces, log cabins of pioneers in the Far East, Christian cathedrals, massive Soviet blocks of concrete, speculative-mining camps, and more. For years now, photographers have traveled across Russia finding and photographing these intriguing ghost towns, empty Soviet factories, toppling houses, and crumbling chapels. ..... READ MORE
    Source: The AtlanticPublished on 2018-08-07
  • Boris Johnson Would Like Your Attention Again
    After a month-long sabbatical from the public eye following his high-profile resignation from Prime Minister Theresa May’s cabinet, Boris Johnson is back. The ex–British foreign secretary’s decision to quit May’s government came as a form of protest to her so-called Chequers plan: a softening of Brexit that would see the United Kingdom maintain a close relationship with the European Union after it leaves the bloc. For a short while, it seemed like we’d heard the last of Johnson—at least until Parliament returns from its summer recess next month.But only a short while. Within a week of quitting his cabinet position, ..... READ MORE
    Source: The AtlanticPublished on 2018-08-07
  • Trump Goes From Threatening Iran to Threatening the World
    Donald Trump and his advisers have a consistent record of confronting and threatening Iran, most prominently by withdrawing from the nuclear deal. But on Tuesday, Trump expanded the threats against Iran to all those who do business with the country, declaring on Twitter they “will NOT be doing business with the United States.”If taken literally, this would mean a new front in America’s economic battle with the Europeans, who have remained in the nuclear agreement—not to mention many other countries around the world determined to do business in Iran. The Iran sanctions have officially been cast. These are the most ..... READ MORE
    Source: The AtlanticPublished on 2018-08-07
  • America Is Not Ready for Exploding Drones
    Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro was intoning something about economic renewal, flanked by his wife and a handful of high officials, in a country gripped by poverty, starvation, and shortages. Then, in a moment broadcast live on television that has since gone viral, his wife’s face changed. For an instant she seemed to duck as she reached for the official next to her; Maduro glanced up with apparent concern. The camera panned to the National Guardsmen in formation on the street before him as dozens suddenly started running. According to the government and witnesses, they had seen explosions in the sky.By ..... READ MORE
    Source: The AtlanticPublished on 2018-08-07
  • The Two Words That Made Saudi Arabia Furious at Canada
    The pandemonium started with a tweet, as so many political uproars seem to do these days.“Canada is gravely concerned about additional arrests of civil society and women’s rights activists in Saudi Arabia, including Samar Badawi,” said a tweet from the Canadian government’s official foreign-policy account last Friday. “We urge the Saudi authorities to immediately release them and all other peaceful human rights activists.” Canada was responding to the arrest days earlier of two activists, the latest targets of a Saudi government crackdown on women’s rights campaigners, more than a dozen of whom have been arrested since May.Within days, the kingdom ..... READ MORE
    Source: The AtlanticPublished on 2018-08-06
  • Photos: Trying to Keep Cool
    Regis Duvignau / Reuters Over the past month, record-setting high temperatures have been recorded across the northern hemisphere. Sometimes dangerous heat waves in Europe, Asia, and North America have driven people to beaches, lakes, water parks, even air-conditioned grocery stores, to find relief. Collected here, recent images of people and animals doing what they can to beat the heat. ..... READ MORE
    Source: The AtlanticPublished on 2018-08-06
  • Fear and Anxiety at Refugee Road
    There are roughly 3,000 immigrants from Mauritania in Columbus, Ohio. They came to America fleeing persecution and slavery in the West African country. For years, ICE allowed even those with failed asylum claims to remain in the U.S. "Since Donald Trump has become president, more than 50 people I know have been detained and deported," says a local Mauritanian community leader. A new documentary from The Atlantic, based on Franklin Foer’s article “How Trump Radicalized ICE,” visits an undocumented immigrant who says he would rather flee to Canada than risk deportation. ..... READ MORE
    Source: The AtlanticPublished on 2018-08-06