INVESTCORP – The True Story Behind Its Creation

The purpose of this true story is to set the record straight. Written more than a quarter of a century after the creation of INVESTCORP, it will show how this unique investment entity was conceived, developed and implemented under the auspices of the Arab Monetary Fund and its President, Dr. Jawad Hashim. The period to which it refers is 1977 to 1984. The story is divided into twelve (12) sub-chapters, starting with Chronology of Events page and ending with Appendixes page which in itself provides ten (10) links to multipage PDF documents.

The Demographic Profiles of Arab States, 2017

From United Nations’ Economic & Social Commission for Western Asia:
The profiles provide demographic data and trends per Arab country for the period 1980-2050, and could serve as a reference for researchers conducting demographic research as well as social research with a population dimension.  The key demographic indicators presented in the profiles include population size, including urban and rural populations, population growth rate, life expectancy at birth, infant mortality rate, under-five mortality rate, maternal mortality ratio, contraceptive prevalence, fertility rate, dependency ratios and population age structure.  This is in addition to data on the international migrant stock, remittances, refugee population, internally displaced persons and education and youth unemployment.

Arab Countries: At a Glance

This is an extract of Dr. Jawad Hashim’s article “The Shape Of The Post Gulf War, Middle-East” which became part of U.S. Congressional Record. Part of that written opinion dealt with the background of the Arab region. The Arab Countries: At a Glance describes characteristics of the Arab countries that still apply now at present time.

The Manifesto — A Plan For National Regeneration

Nearly fifteen years after the invasion and occupation of Iraq, the country is now facing its most crucial test of survival. This Manifesto is the product of three years of reflection and debate, culminating in intense activity throughout 2017. It rejects the politics of division, and the branding of any Iraqi community as enemy. All of those involved in the debate agreed on the importance of introducing a comprehensive platform for reform and change in Iraq and the urgency of doing so immediately.

How to Avoid an ISIS 2.0 in Iraq

We must secure military gains in Iraq with a political victory, argue Michael O’Hanlon and Sara Allawi. Otherwise, we risk the emergence of an ISIS 2.0 among embittered Sunni populations.

The Arab World: Waking From Its Sleep

A quiet revolution has begun in the Arab world; it will be complete only when the last failed dictatorship is voted out. What ails the Arabs? The United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) this week published the fifth in a series of hard-hitting reports on the state of the Arab world. It makes depressing reading. The Arabs are a dynamic and inventive people whose long and proud history includes fabulous contributions to art, culture, science and, of course, religion. The score of modern Arab states, on the other hand, have been impressive mainly for their consistent record of failure.

Articles, opinions, keynotes, reports, papers, publications and books
authored by Dr. Jawad M. Hashim

Oil Soars, U.S. Crude Hits $60/Bbl for First Time Since Mid-2015

Oil Soars, U.S. Crude Hits $60/Bbl for First Time Since Mid-2015

Oil prices surged to 2-1/2-year highs and U.S. crude touched $60 a barrel in light trading volume on Tuesday, boosted by news of an explosion on a Libyan crude pipeline as well as voluntary OPEC-led supply cuts. Iraq’s oil minister said on Monday there would be a balance between supply and demand by the first quarter, leading to a boost in prices. Global oil inventories have decreased to an acceptable level, he added.

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Iraqi Oil Minister Says Expects Oil Market to Be in Balance in First Quarter

Iraqi Oil Minister Says Expects Oil Market to Be in Balance in First Quarter

Iraqi Oil Minister Jabar al-Luaibi said on Monday (December 25, 2017) he was optimistic there would be a balance between supply and demand by the first quarter of 2018, leading to a boost in oil prices. The new contact will allow Zhenhua to receive a $3.5 fee for each barrel of crude produced from the oilfield, Ameedi said, and will serve as a model for all upcoming contracts with international companies. Jalal also said his company has plans to upgrade production from the Neft Khana oilfield near the Iranian border to 8,000 barrels per day from the current 2,000.

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VP Nouri al-Maliki Says Iraq Has to Help Kurdistan Before It’s Too Late

VP Nouri al-Maliki Says Iraq Has to Help Kurdistan Before It’s Too Late

Iraqi Vice President Nouri al-Maliki told Rudaw during an interview in Baghdad on Thursday that the federal government has to help the Kurdistan Region to solve the problems it is facing including the ongoing financial crisis before “it is too late.” He called the events in Khurmatu since October 16 “ethnic cleansing” and one that they are following with great concern. Maliki served as Prime Minister of Iraq for two terms from 2006-2014. Under his tenure the central government cut the Kurdish share of budget in early-2014 over the KRG’s plans to export oil independent of Baghdad. He deployed the Iraqi security forces to the borders of the Kurdistan Region at least twice when he was the PM, and became the first senior Iraqi politician to threaten Kurdistan with the use of force against the Iraqi-opposed Kurdish vote on independence. In a wide-ranging interview, he told Rudaw presenter Ranj Sangawi that he wants both Iraq and the Kurdistan Region to get over what happened in the past, including the disagreement over the Kurdish vote.

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“They Are Not Our Brothers” Hate Speech by Saudi Officials

“They Are Not Our Brothers” Hate Speech by Saudi Officials

The Kingdom of Saudi Arabia traces its origins to a 1744 pact between a religious leader Muhammad ibn Abd al-Wahhab, and the Al Saud family, under which al-Wahhab’s movement enabled the Saudi rulers to expand their political rule in return for enforcing his religious teachings. The power relations between the Saudi royal family and the clerics have changed over time, but the clerics and religious scholars continue to wield power and directly influence the policies and politics of the Saudi state, especially in the justice and education sectors. Since its establishment, the Saudi state has permitted government-appointed religious scholars and clerics to refer to Shia citizens in derogatory terms or demonize them in official documents and religious rulings, which influence government decision-making. In recent years government clerics and others have used the internet and social media to demonize and incite hatred against Shia Muslims and others who do not conform to their views.

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Denied Dignity: Systematic Discrimination and Hostility toward Saudi Shia Citizens

Denied Dignity: Systematic Discrimination and Hostility toward Saudi Shia Citizens

The Saudi Arabian government for its part reacted with repressive measures of arrest and a clampdown on public airing of Shia grievances rather than seeking dialogue to prevent further conflict. Nevertheless, underlying discrimination has risen. Saudi authorities have intensified ongoing restrictions on Shia communal life. The Saudi government should urgently address the underlying reasons for sectarian tension, and end systematic discrimination against the Shia.

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The Arab World (by The Economist)

The Arab World (by The Economist)

A quiet revolution has begun in the Arab world; it will be complete only when the last failed dictatorship is voted out. What ails the Arabs? The United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) this week published the fifth in a series of hard-hitting reports on the state of the Arab world. It makes depressing reading. The Arabs are a dynamic and inventive people whose long and proud history includes fabulous contributions to art, culture, science and, of course, religion. The score of modern Arab states, on the other hand, have been impressive mainly for their consistent record of failure.

read more
  • Britain Is Rushing to Seal a Brexit Deal Few Support
    LONDON—With less than 140 days left before Britain leaves the European Union, negotiators have reached a provisional Brexit deal. The agreement, which was backed by U.K. Prime Minister Theresa May’s cabinet on Wednesday, marks a breakthrough in often fractious talks, and could offer businesses, officials, and private citizens a sorely-needed roadmap on what life looks like for Britain outside the EU.There is still one major hurdle for May to overcome, though: Will it pass muster with parliament? No one—not least the prime minister herself—appears certain of the answer. And if it doesn’t, what then was the point of her government ..... READ MORE
    Source: The AtlanticPublished on 2018-11-14
  • Why Young Pakistanis Are Learning Chinese
    GILGIT, Pakistan—On a July morning, Saqlain Abbas, 26 years old, stood before rows of students, Mandarin textbook in hand, while a Pakistani soldier sat silently at the back of the classroom with a gun at his side. Hanging on the wall was a collection of idyllic Chinese landscapes—the reddish-orange mountains of Gansu, the placid waters of a lake in Xinjiang. Here, at Karakoram International University, in a remote, rugged terrain that is still contested territory between India and Pakistan, the Pakistani military has been sponsoring free Mandarin courses for indigent students.“Previously, students were more inclined toward English,” Muhammad Ilyas, the ..... READ MORE
    Source: The AtlanticPublished on 2018-11-14
  • The 2018 National Geographic Photo Contest
    Todd Kennedy National Geographic magazine’s annual photo contest is still open for entries for just a couple more days, with the deadline for submissions coming up on November 15. The grand-prize winner this year will receive $5,000—all winners will be announced in December. The folks at National Geographic were once again kind enough to let me choose among the contest entries so far and share them here with you. Captions are written by the individual photographers and lightly edited for content. ..... READ MORE
    Source: The AtlanticPublished on 2018-11-13
  • Qatar’s Foreign Policy: Balancing New Alliances in a Contested Region
    Members 22 October 2018 - 1:00pm to 2:00pmAdd to CalendariCalendar Outlook Google Yahoo Chatham House | 10 St James's Square | London | SW1Y 4LE HE Lolwah R M Al-Khater, Spokesperson of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, State of QatarDr Abdullah Baabood, Director, Gulf Studies Center, Qatar UniversityDr Courtney Freer, Research Officer, Middle East Centre, LSEHelen Lackner, Research Associate, London Middle East Institute, SOASChair: Dr Neil Quilliam, Senior Research Fellow, Middle East and North Africa Programme, Chatham House  Register Register Following the Arab Spring, Qatar saw an opportunity to move away ..... READ MORE
    Source: Chatham House: Middle East & North AfricaPublished on 2018-10-05
  • Syria’s Transactional State: How the Conflict Changed the Syrian State’s Exercise of Power
    Invitation Only Research Event 22 October 2018 - 3:00pm to 5:00pmAdd to CalendariCalendar Outlook Google Yahoo Chatham House | 10 St James's Square | London | SW1Y 4LE Lina Khatib, Head, Middle East and North Africa Programme, Chatham HouseLina Sinjab, Consulting Senior Fellow, Middle East and North Africa Programme, Chatham HouseChair: Ruth Citrin, Associate Fellow, Middle East and North Africa Programme, Chatham House As debate on the Syrian conflict migrates towards discussions of reconstruction, stabilization and resilience, there is an implied assumption that Bashar al-Assad’s regime is 'winning' the war and that the Syrian state ..... READ MORE
    Source: Chatham House: Middle East & North AfricaPublished on 2018-10-04
  • Voices of Jordan: The Kingdom in the Centre of the Middle East
    Members 31 October 2018 - 1:00pm to 2:00pmAdd to CalendariCalendar Outlook Google Yahoo Chatham House | 10 St James's Square | London | SW1Y 4LE Imad El-Anis, Senior Lecturer, Nottingham Trent UniversityRana F. Sweis, Journalist and Author, Voices of Jordan; Stanton Fellow, Arab Institute for Security StudiesChair: Dr Neil Quilliam, Senior Research Fellow, Middle East and North Africa Programme, Chatham House Register Register Jordan’s diverse socioeconomic make-up encapsulates, like no other state in the region, both the array of pressing short-term problems facing the region and the underlying challenges that Arab states ..... READ MORE
    Source: Chatham House: Middle East & North AfricaPublished on 2018-10-02
  • Why Israelis Shy from Victory
    One day, imagine, a U.S. president tells an Israeli prime minister: "Palestinian extremism damages American security. We need you to end it by achieving victoryover the Palestinians. Do what it takes within legal, moral, and practical boundaries." The ..... READ MORE
    Source: Daniel PipesPublished on 2018-08-31
  • Venezuela’s Tyranny of Bad Ideas
    Ideas run the world: good ones create freedom and wealth; bad ones, oppression and poverty. Sure, money is important, but money is but a means to an end. Ideas are the end. You are not what you eat; you are what you think. Politicians in particular fall ..... READ MORE
    Source: Daniel PipesPublished on 2018-08-26
  • Hungary: Not “Submitting to Islam”
    BUDAPEST – No European head of government talks remotely like Hungary's Prime Minister Victor Orbán. For example, he recently spoke of building in Hungary a "constitutional order based on national and Christian foundations," thereby avoiding a future in ..... READ MORE
    Source: Daniel PipesPublished on 2018-08-13

LATEST BOOK FROM JAWAD HASHIM

Political Memoirs of an Iraqi Minister Jawad Hashim: 1967–2000

This book is the second and updated edition of the first one which was published in 2003 under the same title.    At the time, in 2003, one of the little highlighted benefits of Operation Iraqi Freedom was an expectation for a whole series of books, articles and discussion assessing the nation’s Baathist years from 1967 to 2003. As the United States became involved in the long-term reconstruction of Iraq and ensuring the viability of that traumatized nation,  it was vital that Arabic books coming out of a free Iraq be examined by American military planners and policymakers. This is one of the first books to be published in 2003 by Dr. Jawad Hashim, who served as Minister of Financial Planning from 1967-1971 and again from 1972-1974.    In this book, Dr. Jawad Hashim offers insight to Arab readers as a person intimate with the inner-workings of the Baathist regimes and discusses how Saddam hijacked Ba’athism to serve his own personal ambitions.    He wrote this book in exile and on the eve of Operation Iraqi Freedom.

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